Orthodoxy

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In response to G. K. Chesterton’s book Heretics, H. G. Wells said, “I will begin to worry about my philosophy…when Mr. Chesterton has given us his.” And that is what Chesterton set out to do in Orthodoxy. But like any good theorist, he truly believed he could not undertake this task without first articulating what he did not agree with. After he had completed this with Heretics, he set out to articulate the philosophy that he had come to believe.
In a personal way, Chesterton uses “a set of mental pictures” to describe his journey in discovering the truth. Among his key points is the role of reason and fantasy in helping him to discover true orthodoxy. They led him to see that this was not a product of chance, but was fashioned by a divine Creator. His timeless wisdom is relevant to the struggles of many Christians today.
Chesterton was surprised to find that what he discovered about orthodoxy was not unique to him at all; rather, it had been passed down through many generations. And he admitted, after much struggle and in much humility, “I will not call it my philosophy, for I did not make it. God and humanity made it; and it made me.”

G. K. (Gilbert Keith) Chesterton (1874–1936) was an English writer, philosopher, satirist, and social critic. During his lifetime, the prolific Chesterton wrote eighty books, several hundred poems, some two hundred short stories, four thousand essays, and several plays. He was also known as a strong debater and Christian apologist. He often took on what he considered to be the flawed philosophy of modernism found in the writings of his good friends Oscar Wilde ...Read More

G. K. (Gilbert Keith) Chesterton (1874–1936) was an English writer, philosopher, satirist, and social critic. During his lifetime, the prolific Chesterton wrote eighty books, several hundred poems, some two hundred short stories, four thousand essays, and several plays. He was also known as a strong debater and Christian apologist. He often took on what he considered to be the flawed philosophy of modernism found in the writings of his good friends Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw. It was Shaw who once referred to Chesterton in Time magazine as “a man of colossal genius.” Chesterton’s writings consistently displayed wit and a sense of humor. His ingenious use of paradox in his commentaries on the leading political, economic, philosophical, and theological beliefs makes his writings as relevant today as they were in his day.

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