Aimee Semple McPherson

Aimee Semple McPherson (1890–1944) was a woman ahead of her time. She crossed the United States with two young children in an era when women were not permitted to vote. She established an evangelistic ministry and built a large evangelistic center at a time when women were expected to marry, have children, and leave religion and other “important” pursuits to men. But God had a plan for her life that did not take into account human ways of doing things. As an evangelist who preached the gospel not only across the United States but also around the world, “Sister Aimee” incorporated the cutting-edge communications media of her day, becoming a pioneer in broadcasting the gospel on the radio. Upon opening the doors of Angelus Temple in Los Angeles in 1923, Sister Aimee developed an extensive social ministry, feeding more than 1.5 million people... Read More

Aimee Semple McPherson (1890–1944) was a woman ahead of her time. She crossed the United States with two young children in an era when women were not permitted to vote. She established an evangelistic ministry and built a large evangelistic center at a time when women were expected to marry, have children, and leave religion and other “important” pursuits to men. But God had a plan for her life that did not take into account human ways of doing things. As an evangelist who preached the gospel not only across the United States but also around the world, “Sister Aimee” incorporated the cutting-edge communications media of her day, becoming a pioneer in broadcasting the gospel on the radio. Upon opening the doors of Angelus Temple in Los Angeles in 1923, Sister Aimee developed an extensive social ministry, feeding more than 1.5 million people during the Great Depression. She summarized her message into four major points, which she called “the Foursquare Gospel”: Jesus is the Savior; Jesus is the Healer; Jesus is the Baptizer, with the Holy Spirit; and Jesus is the soon-coming King. She founded the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel, also known as The Foursquare Church, which continues to spread the Foursquare Gospel throughout the world to this day. Time magazine named her as one of the most influential people of the twentieth century.

Read Less