Plain Account of Christian Perfection

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John Wesley offers a comprehensive teaching on the doctrine of Christian perfection. In it, he describes the evolution of his own theological reasoning, telling the story of how he came to understand and preach this doctrine in his own life. 
 

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John Wesley (1703–1791) is known for two things: co-founding Methodism and his tremendous work ethic. In the 1700s, when one’s options for land travel included walking, journeying by horseback, or riding in a carriage, Wesley logged more than four thousand miles a year. During his lifetime, he preached about forty thousand sermons. In 1729, he became a tutor at Oxford University, where he founded a religious club that people nicknamed the Methodists. In ...Read More

John Wesley (1703–1791) is known for two things: co-founding Methodism and his tremendous work ethic. In the 1700s, when one’s options for land travel included walking, journeying by horseback, or riding in a carriage, Wesley logged more than four thousand miles a year. During his lifetime, he preached about forty thousand sermons. In 1729, he became a tutor at Oxford University, where he founded a religious club that people nicknamed the Methodists. In 1738, Wesley’s life was changed while attending a religious meeting in London. Someone gave a reading of Martin Luther’s Preface to Romans. Wesley later said, “I felt my heart strangely warmed.” Afterwards, he became a great preacher, traveling throughout the British Isles. Although he never intended to form a new church separate from the Church of England, his followers soon began to form their own organization. The Methodists placed great emphasis on living a holy life and they had many travelling preachers. After the American War of Independence, Methodism spread in the U.S. A professed opponent of slavery, Wesley published his Thoughts on Slavery in 1774. He preached his last sermon on February 23, 1791, and died a week later, on March 2, at age eighty-seven.

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